Our reviewers evaluate products and services based on unbiased research. Top Consumer Reviews may earn money when you click on a link. Learn more about our process.

How to Choose a Mobility Scooter

Wednesday, February 24th

How to Choose a Mobility Scooter

There are many differences between a powered mobility scooter and a powered wheelchair.

Powered wheelchairs are smaller, primarily for indoor use, and can be either front-wheel or rear-wheel drive. They provide mobility for people who have limited use of their arms and hands. They are often controlled by a single joystick that can be mounted on either the right or left. An advantage of a powered wheelchair is that they have no obstruction in the front, so they can pull directly up to a table or counter. They are also compact, not much longer or wider than a regular chair. This means they can be driven down hallways and through doors that might be too narrow for a larger scooter. If you need to be able to get around in your own home and have limited use of your arms or hands, a chair might be right for you.

Scooters are built primarily for outdoor use (or in large venues, like shopping malls) and are for people who are able to do some walking, for example getting off the scooter and walking into a store to shop. Scooters come in three wheel or four wheel configurations, often with pneumatic tires to handle uneven terrain. Larger tires provide increased ground clearance, which helps cross low obstacles that might be more challenging to powered wheelchairs. Scooters usually come with handlebars mounted on a steering column in the front, so they cannot be pulled directly up to a table. To use a mobility scooter, you must be able to steer and operate the controls with your arms and hands. There is usually an accelerator control mounted to one side of the handlebars or the other. Releasing the accelerator is what activates the brake.

Every chair or scooter should have a comfortable seat, a backrest, and support for the feet that together provide a sturdy and safe platform for riding. The seat on a mobility scooter will usually swivel right and left, making mounting and dismounting easier. A scooter might require a higher step up or down compared to a powered wheelchair.

If you are going to be using your chair or scooter outdoors, the seat should be wide enough for you to sit comfortably in outdoor clothing. However, it should not be so wide that you do not feel secure when sitting facing squarely forward. On the other hand, if the seat is too narrow you might be unable to shift your weight occasionally and limit the amount of time you can sit comfortably.

To sum up:

The Best Mobility Scooter Companies Compare Mobility Scooter Companies Compare Mobility Scooter Company Reviews What are the best Mobility Scooter Companies Best Mobility Scooter Company Reviews

Mobility Scooter Company FAQ

For people who have difficulty with getting around (due to age, illness, or other reasons), mobility scooters represent freedom. You've probably seen them in use at theme parks, at the grocery store, and other locations that require a lot of walking. Mobility scooters differ from power wheelchairs in that they are operated more like a moped, and users need to be able to get on and off.
Most scooters are classified by style and use. For example, you can get folding scooters if you don't have a rack for transporting a full-size scooter on your vehicle, travel scooters for vacations, scooters for indoor/outdoor use, and so forth.
As you shop for a scooter, your first considerations will probably be practical. What is the intended usage? Do you need a model with a higher rider weight capacity? Do you prefer three wheels or four? From there, it's time to have fun: accessories range from cup holders to flags, canopies for frequent outdoor trips in sunny weather, and beyond.
Mobility scooters range from $500 to over $7000. Be sure to read the fine print to determine what is included in your base price: some scooters come with a free charger and battery, but others require you to purchase them in addition to the cost of the scooter.
Many retailers of mobility scooters include delivery in the retail price. If you want "white glove delivery" that covers the assembly and setup of your scooter, expect to pay $100 to $200 for the service.
Medicare Part B considers mobility scooters as "durable medical equipment". If your physician writes an order confirming that you have a medical need for a scooter, you will qualify. Medicare covers 80% of the cost, and the remaining 20% is your responsibility (though that portion could be covered by a Medigap plan, if you have one). Similar terms apply if you have coverage through Medicaid.
Yes, mobility scooters usually have warranty coverage, both through the manufacturer and the retailer. The warranty period is typically a year and includes in-home technician visits if needed. You may also be able to purchase an extended warranty for longer coverage.
Return policies vary by retailer. Most have a period ranging from 15 to 30 days in which you can send your scooter back; however, hefty restocking fees of up to 25% of the purchase price could be a deterrent. You may have to pay for return shipping fees as well.

Compare Mobility Scooter Companies

Select any 2 Mobility Scooter Companies to compare them head to head

best-mobility-scooter-stores
  • Go Mobility Scooters
  • Spinlife
  • Easy Med Online
  • Medical Supply Depot
  • Colonial Medical
  • CWI Medical
  • Hoveround
  • All Electric Scooters
  • US Medical Supplies
  • Heartland America
Go Mobility Scooters vs Spinlife Go Mobility Scooters vs Easy Med Online Go Mobility Scooters vs Medical Supply Depot Go Mobility Scooters vs Colonial Medical Go Mobility Scooters vs CWI Medical Go Mobility Scooters vs Hoveround Go Mobility Scooters vs All Electric Scooters Go Mobility Scooters vs US Medical Supplies Go Mobility Scooters vs Heartland America Spinlife vs Easy Med Online Spinlife vs Medical Supply Depot Spinlife vs Colonial Medical Spinlife vs CWI Medical Spinlife vs Hoveround Spinlife vs All Electric Scooters Spinlife vs US Medical Supplies Spinlife vs Heartland America Easy Med Online vs Medical Supply Depot Easy Med Online vs Colonial Medical Easy Med Online vs CWI Medical Easy Med Online vs Hoveround Easy Med Online vs All Electric Scooters Easy Med Online vs US Medical Supplies Easy Med Online vs Heartland America Medical Supply Depot vs Colonial Medical Medical Supply Depot vs CWI Medical Medical Supply Depot vs Hoveround Medical Supply Depot vs All Electric Scooters Medical Supply Depot vs US Medical Supplies Medical Supply Depot vs Heartland America Colonial Medical vs CWI Medical Colonial Medical vs Hoveround Colonial Medical vs All Electric Scooters Colonial Medical vs US Medical Supplies Colonial Medical vs Heartland America CWI Medical vs Hoveround CWI Medical vs All Electric Scooters CWI Medical vs US Medical Supplies CWI Medical vs Heartland America Hoveround vs All Electric Scooters Hoveround vs US Medical Supplies Hoveround vs Heartland America All Electric Scooters vs US Medical Supplies All Electric Scooters vs Heartland America US Medical Supplies vs Heartland America
Compare the Best Mobility Scooter Companies
- VS -
Review the Best Mobility Scooter Companies
See the Best Mobility Scooter Company

Since you're interested in Mobility Scooter Companies, here are some other reviews you might find interesting.

The Best Reviews of Mobility Scooter Companies