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Eliminating Tinnitus

Wednesday, February 8th

Eliminating Tinnitus

Unfortunately there is no known scientific "cure" for tinnitus. However, there are preventative measures that can be taken, and often tinnitus is caused by an underlying issue that if found and dealt with, can possibly minimize the noise.

Before we talk about products to help reduce or minimize tinnitus, there are some great prevention tips that are worth noting that can help individuals steer clear of tinnitus all together. Some types of tinnitus may be avoided by following preventive measures. Tinnitus can be prevented by wearing ear plugs at work (if there is excessive noise), at sporting events, at rock concerts, while hunting, and using a lawnmower. Also, it is not recommended to use cotton swabs to clean the ears (it pushes wax against the ear drum). Exercising regularly and maintaining good cardiovascular health may reduce the chances of developing tinnitus linked to blood vessel disorders.

If a cause can be found, an Audiologist or ENT (Ear Nose Throat) doctor is often the one who will be the best help in identifying the cause of tinnitus. If an underlying cause of the tinnitus is found, a doctor will relieve that condition and the tinnitus usually subsides. This may include removing earwax, relieving blood vessel conditions, or changing medication regimens. Unfortunately, in many cases, the underlying cause cannot be identified therefore tinnitus remains as a nuisance.

There is no specific solution for tinnitus, but there are different options that have helped individuals manage it. Sometimes a combination of products is more effective than a single one. Simple options like white noise machines, hearing aids, and masking devices, may be offered because of their ability to suppress sounds, making the tinnitus less annoying.

In some people making dietary changes can reduce the loudness of the sound people hear. Most diets for tinnitus include reducing alcohol and coffee consumption. If tinnitus has been linked to excess fluid, taking diuretics to reduce the amount of fluid in a person's system can help as well.

Some alternative methods can possibly help. There is no guarantee, but since they are not harmful, they might be worth the try. A few options are taking minerals such as magnesium or zinc, herbal preparations such as Ginkgo biloba, homeopathic remedies, or B vitamins. Others have experienced tinnitus relief with acupuncture, cranio-sacral therapy, magnets, hyperbaric oxygen, or hypnosis. There are companies that make specific non-prescription formulas to address the symptoms of tinnitus; many people have found tinnitus relief with these products as well.

Few other options include, Drug Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, Sound Therapy, Biofeedback, and Cochlear Implants/Electrical Stimulation. Remember there is no "cure", but there are many different options that can definitely help reduce the ear-ringing and other symptoms of tinnitus.

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Tinnitus Product FAQ

Tinnitus is a sensation of roaring, buzzing, hissing or ringing in your ears - with no external source. It can be constant or intermittent and may be exacerbated by stress, anxiety, or fatigue.
There can be many causes of tinnitus. It may be as simple as a buildup of wax in the ear or as complicated as a medical condition like Meniere's disease. Loud sounds can cause both tinnitus and hearing loss, especially with long-term exposure.
In the US alone, almost 50 million people experience tinnitus in a given year, with 20% of those cases being severe enough that the patients seek medical attention. That percentage increases sharply among people in careers that regularly expose them to loud noises, such as musicians, airport ground staff, and construction workers.
For some people, tinnitus goes away on its own. Unfortunately, for many people with tinnitus, something else is required. This can involve working with an audiologist or using an over-the-counter product to try and manage the symptoms.
Yes. These products usually consist of an herbal blend of ingredients to help calm your nerves and soothe your symptoms. While it's still recommended that you consult with your physician, an OTC tinnitus remedy can offer some relief while you determine the cause of your problem and the best long-term approach.
No. You'll pay $40-$60 for a one-month supply, depending on the remedy you select.
Yes, most of the time. Some manufacturers of tinnitus relief products will let you use them for up to a year and you can request a refund if you don't see improvement.
Yes. They're typically a blend of vitamins, minerals and herbal ingredients that have been safely used for many years. Of course, it's always wise to review each product's formula and make sure that there are no components that are contraindicated due to allergies or other medications you may be taking.
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