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Find My Past vs Genealogy Bank

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FIND MY PAST

Find My Past began more than forty years ago in London, England, as a group of professional genealogists and heir hunters worked together under the name of Title Research. Their work evolved into a modern-day genealogy service that focuses heavily on records from England, Wales, Ireland and Scotland. For family history researchers whose ancestors came from the UK, Find My Past may have records that aren't available on other genealogy sites, with more than 1,000 exclusive collections that include British newspaper archives, parish records dating back to 1538, Irish court records, and more.

On the other hand, for beginning researchers based in the US or Canada, or for those whose family tree has no known roots in the UK, the records available from other parts of the world on Find My Past may not be broad enough. Fortunately, as with most of the genealogy services in our review, Find My Past offers a free 14-day trial, so that users can determine if the records and services they provide are worth the cost: $9.95/month or $114.50/year for a US and Canada subscription, or $19.95/month or $239.50/year for a World subscription.

We think that Find My Past's benefits to 12-month subscribers, known as Find My Past First, offers some unique perks. As a yearly subscriber, users can access monthly webinars on various genealogy topics, help decide which new records will be added next, and enter monthly contests to win prizes. Find My Past First also gives subscribers access to discounts with partner companies, such as Family Tree Magazine, Hooked on Genealogy, and Lifebook.

Additionally, Find My Past is one of the only genealogy services to offer access to records on an a la carte basis. For those who prefer to pay only for the records they need rather than for a monthly or yearly subscription, Find My Past allows them to buy credits - 60 for $10.95, 300 for $37.95, or 900 for $82.95 - and use them to purchase access to specific documents. On average, records cost between 5 and 60 credits, and purchased records can be viewed an unlimited number of times. Depending on the type of record requested, this may or may not be more affordable than requesting a copy of the document from a local government. Customers should also be aware that credits are only valid for 90 days from the date of purchase and expire if they are not used within that time. On the other hand, customers can have expired credits reissued to their account if they purchase more credits or a subscription within three months of their expiration.

Find My Past also offers the ability to create a family tree and connect with others; however, with its user base predominantly located in the UK, it might be more challenging for subscribers in the US to find and connect with others' family trees.

In general, Find My Past is an excellent resource for those whose genealogy takes them anywhere within the United Kingdom. We applaud their efforts to continually expand their offerings both within the UK and outside of it, but are disappointed that the US and Canada records currently available are somewhat skimpy compared with other sites while still having a relatively high monthly subscription cost.

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GENEALOGY BANK

As part of the Newsbank, Inc. group of services, Genealogy Bank helps individuals discover more about their family history through obituaries and other information typically published in a newspaper, military records, pamphlets, and more. Their database includes more than 7,000 historical newspapers from large cities and small towns throughout the United States dating back to as early as 1690.

There are many user testimonials that express delight with finding information through Genealogy Bank that they were unable to find elsewhere, especially those whose roots lie in parts of America that are off the beaten path. On the other hand, because Genealogy Bank does not have many of the documents traditionally used as a starting point (for example, US Census records, governmental registers of births and deaths), and it also lacks the ability to create, share, and connect with one's family tree, it may be of most use to those genealogists who already have established a considerable amount of information about their family tree and are hoping to dig deeper or find that one person that has eluded them for years.

Unlike most of the genealogy services in our review, Genealogy Bank does not offer a free trial. Customers can opt for a 30-day trial for $9.95, after which point their options are a $19.95 monthly subscription or an annual subscription for $69.95. On a positive note, there is a 100% satisfaction guarantee within the first 30 days, effectively making it a free 30-day trial if the customer chooses to ask for the full refund.

In short, what Genealogy Bank does, it does well: namely, providing access to more than 320 years of newspapers and other types of printed materials published throughout the United States. For family history buffs hoping to discover details about the day-to-day lives of their ancestors as revealed in society pages, featured news stories and more, Genealogy Bank may provide information that they have been seeking for years. However, for someone who is new to genealogy research or who is looking to create an online family tree, Genealogy Bank comes up short compared with other services in our review.

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Genealogy

To help you find the Best Ancestry Services, TopConsumerReviews.com provides you with an in-depth comparison of Find My Past and Genealogy Bank.

Genealogy, or the study of family history and lines of descent, is second only to gardening in terms of its popularity in the United States. From TV shows like Finding Your Roots and Who Do You Think You Are?, to DNA testing kits that show an individual's unique genetic roots and relatives throughout the world, it's easy to see that learning about one's ancestry has captured the hearts and minds of millions of people.

In the past, researching a family tree was an arduous, often lengthy process. Vital documents had to be requested from local, state, and federal governments, and sometimes required proof of kinship in order to be granted. Many of these requests came with significant fees, sometimes as much as $20 per document.

Also, it was not uncommon for a request to go unfilled because the details provided by the requestor were incorrect - perhaps the individual was actually born in an adjacent county, or in a different year, or had a different name on his or her birth certificate.

Further complicating matters, most people's family trees contain ancestors whose native language was not English, making it even more difficult to locate and request information. Fortunately, today's genealogy buff has access to an unprecedented amount of birth and death certificates, obituaries, census records, and other researchers' results, just to name a few.

Genealogy services can help people find out more about their family history in a matter of minutes, rather than months or even years, through indexed records, broad databases, and even translations of vital documents from many different countries. Modern technology also allows genealogy buffs to take their research to the next level through DNA testing.

Often with just a simple swab of the cheek or a vial of saliva, curious individuals can get scientific evidence of their roots, connect with people who have shared ancestors, even discover family traits that have been passed down for generations.

  • Cost. How much will you need to pay to access the records and other information on the site? Are there monthly options, if you only need to find a few records, or discounts for yearly subscriptions?
  • Variety of information available. What types of records does the site provide? Is it a wide range of governmental data (e.g. census, death certificates, etc.), published information (e.g. obituaries and other newspaper articles), and family trees submitted by other users? Can the information the site provides be found for free on other websites?
  • Family tree features. Does the service allow you to create your own family tree and easily link information you find on the site? Are you able to connect with other researchers interested in the same ancestral line? Can you add photos, stories, and other personal details to your family tree?

TopConsumerReviews.com has reviewed and ranked the best Genealogy Services available today. We hope these reviews help you find your ancestors and discover more about your own family tree today!



Genealogy In The News

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A serial rapist eluded police for years. Then they searched a genealogy site.

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Genealogy website lands UC Berkeley worker behind bars for rape spree

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'Real-life boogieman' who raped women across California arrested with genealogy site data

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Poplar Forest's focus on slavery and genealogy aims to tell the stories we've never heard

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DNA and genetic genealogy used to ID suspect in "NorCal Rapist" case

SACRAMENTO -- Sacramento police have made an arrest in the case of a serial rapist who terrorized Northern California for 15 years, authorities announced Friday. Investigators used genetic genealogy, ...

Published:  Sat, 22 Sep 2018 14:29:36 GMT



Update: Mason City library shouldn't house private genealogy collection, trustees say

MASON CITY | The North Central Iowa Genealogical Society and its collection may be looking for a new home if it cannot reach a compromise with the Mason City Library Board of Trustees within the ...

Published:  Wed, 19 Sep 2018 14:40:00 GMT



A Genealogy Site DNA Test Just Brought Down Another Serial Rapist

Genealogy site GEDmatch is to thank for bringing another serial rapist to justice 27 years after his first assault. California authorities have arrested Roy Charles Waller and charged him with 12 coun...

Published:  Sat, 22 Sep 2018 11:57:00 GMT




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