TopConsumerReviews.com is a world-leading consumer product review site. We provide detailed reviews and ratings for thousands of products and services.

 

Go To Reviews >

Who Gets Tinnitus?

Anyone can get tinnitus, though some people are more likely to develop the condition. This includes, white people, older adults (over the age of 65), men, and those with age-related hearing loss. Also, people who have been exposed to loud noises for extended periods of time have a greater chance of developing tinnitus. Those with post-traumatic stress disorder are also at a greater risk.

Sadly, military personnel are at a high risk for developing tinnitus since they are exposed to such loud noises over a long period of time. Tinnitus is currently the number one miliatary connected disability for veterans from all periods of service. Since 2005, the number of veterans receiving disability for tinnitus has increased by at least 15 percent each year. The total number of vets awarded disability compensation for tinnitus at the end of 2010 surpassed 744,000. Soon it is estimated that 1.5 million vets will receive compensation for tinnitus, which will cost American taxpayers over $2.26 billion. Tinnitus is a growing problem for America's military personnel. It can have long term effects on their health and fitness because it can disrupt their sleep, affect their ability to think clearly, create stress in relationships, and limit their ability to hold a job.

Another group largely affected by tinnitus are musicians and music lovers. Whether they play music for a living or as a hobby, or just listen to loud music, they may be at risk for developing hearing loss and subsequent tinnitus. It does not matter the type of music, jazz, classical, rock, heavy metal, Latin, it all can be too loud. If you play music, it is suggested to get special, custom-made hearing protection since you play, sit or stand near loud instruments and speakers. Others involved with the music industry like performers and audio engineers are also at risk for noise-induced tinnitus. Music is a part of so many people's lives, many like to listen to it too loud. The negative effects might not begin to show in the short run, but tinnitus arises as a cumulative effect of noise over a period of many years.

Individuals who work near loud equipment such as an aircraft, loud equipment or machinery, forest industry personnel, construction and shooting range operators are another significant at-risk group. Often times the hearing protection devices that individuals use are not strong enough to prevent the loud noises from preventing tinnitus after exposure of long periods of time.

Tinnitus is also prevalent in seniors as one of many age-related hearing problems in the older population. Causes likely include the cumulative effect of loud noises and general noise pollution over the years.

Go To Reviews >

Top Consumer Reviews Articles

TopConsumerReviews.com provides unique articles that you won't find anywhere else on the internet. These articles are designed to help you make the most informed decisions possible.


Tinnitus In The News

Five People Told Us What They Do For Their Tinnitus

A version of this article originally appeared on Tonic Netherlands. After performing in bands for a decade, listening to music on headphones with the volume cranked up all the way, and dancing next to ...

Published:  Mon, 16 Jul 2018 01:56:00 GMT



Mayo Clinic Q&A: tinnitus causes, treatments; liquid biopsies

What causes tinnitus, and is there anything that can be done to get rid of it Tinnitus, the sensation of hearing a sound when no external sound is present, often is described as a ringing, buzzing, r...

Published:  Fri, 06 Jul 2018 02:04:00 GMT



No cure, but tinnitus can still be managed

Tinnitus - the sensation of hearing a sound when no external sound is present - often is described as a ringing, buzzing, roaring, clicking, humming, pulsing, or hissing sound, or any combination of t...

Published:  Fri, 13 Jul 2018 11:35:00 GMT



People With Chronic Migraines May be At an Increased Risk of Developing Tinnitus And Other Ear Disorders, Says Study

People with chronic migraines may be at an increased risk of developing tinnitus - feeling of ringing in the ears - and other inner ear disorders, than those without the severe headache condition, say...

Published:  Fri, 13 Jul 2018 21:28:00 GMT



Tinnitus: Mindfulness may succeed where other treatments fail

Healthline Media, Inc. would like to process and share personal data (e.g., mobile ad id) and data about your use of our site (e.g., content interests) with our third party partners (see a current lis...

Published:  Tue, 03 Jul 2018 09:02:00 GMT



Mindfulness May Ease Tinnitus Symptoms

New research has found that a mindfulness-based approach to tinnitus could transform treatment of the condition. Led by Dr. Laurence McKenna from University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Tru...

Published:  Sat, 07 Jul 2018 05:12:00 GMT




- View Full Site -